If You Want More Of Something Be Sure To Pay For It


 

| EJF Home | Find Help | Help the EJF | Comments? | Get EJF newsletter | Newsletters |

| Domestic Violence Book | DV Site Map | Data tables | DV bibliography | DV index |

 

| Chapter 3 — The Impact Of Domestic Violence Laws On Veterans And National Security |

| Next — Another Victim Of The Homeland Security State by William Grigg |

| Back — Feminist Challenge To Secretary Of Defense Rumsfeld by Phyllis Schlafly |


 

Index

Review

False reporting

PTSD, TBI, and a melange of other service related problems

Rewarding false reporting

Transitional compensation: Help for victims of domestic abuse

Eligibility

Compensation

Additional assistance

Other resources

Family Advocacy Program (FAP) locator

Your installation's support services

Military One Source


 

Review

Top

Unquestionably there are real victims of domestic violence within military families.

In a previous article it was pointed out that since 1994 the Army has found two male victims of domestic abuse for every female victim. In another article descriptions of the abuse and violence many soldiers and airmen had undergone at the hands of their intimate partners were presented based on interviews with these troops at the bases surrounding Colorado Springs.

We have also heard from female veterans as well about the violence and sexual harassment they have endured. However, sexual harassment is by no means limited to females in the military.

But the numbers of court cases, particularly with regard to male arrests, and as compared to other statistical data make it plain that there are more cases of false reporting than actual domestic violence and abuse.

False reporting

Top

Reasons for false reporting commonly presented to the Equal Justice Foundation include but are certainly not limited to:

Custody: Desire to gain the upper hand in a custody battle. A dramatic 911 domestic disturbance call, or getting a protection order against the man is considered a "silver bullet" in order to win in these cases.

Infidelity: Wife is having an affair, wants a divorce but wants to keep the house, the kids, the car, the finances, and everything else they own plus keep half his retirement and receive many other benefits as described below. All too often this happens shortly after the serviceman returns from a combat deployment and he finds out about the good times she has been having while he was in combat.

Paternity fraud: Wife or girlfriend has a child that she knows or suspects isn't the serviceman's but wants to collect child support from him as her deadbeat lover has nothing or has disappeared. Filing a paternity claim while he is deployed is quite likely to result in a default judgement for child support and the military will honor the court order without question.

Vengeance or revenge: She thinks he done her wrong and she isn't going to let him off easy. A hysterical call to 911 with a little drama for effect and he is enjoying the hospitality of the local steel hotel.

PTSD, TBI, and a melange of other service related problems

Top

With the ever increasing numbers of servicemen and women who have endured multiple combat tours in our current wars there are also problems with disabilities being treated as though they were domestic violence. And many times post traumatic stress and traumatic brain injuries will present in a manner indistinguishable from intimate partner violence.

Also drugs such as Lariam, Zoloft, Prozac, and others that have been widely prescribed or, in the case of Lariam, required for troops have been implicated in erratic, violent, and homicidal/suicidal behavior. And again these problems often present as domestic violence and have been used by some women to take advantage of the law in gaining a divorce or child custody.

Rewarding false reporting

Top

Obviously the way to promote more false reporting is to reward it and there are numerous programs available for such strumpets to take advantage of. While many of these programs are legitimate and offer needed help and care, all too often they degenerate into ideologically-driven cabals with the objective of destroying men and the military. And in some cases these destructive programs are funded through the various military branches as has been our experience with a number of base Family Advocacy Programs, or directly by the Department of Defense, which seems to be the case with MilitaryOneSource.com (and if any male victim of domestic abuse has received fair and equal treatment from them please contact us at comments@ejfi.org). Otherwise our experience suggests the following only holds for female "victims," or those claiming to be "victims" in order to gain financial reward for their perfidy. And if our evaluation is in error please let us know and we will make such corrections as can be proven.

Many times with other programs when we've asked for comments on how much help victims have received, women have had plenty to say on how FUBAR the program is. We have a chapter on Shelters For Battered Women filled with such feedback and would also like to hear from women on the merits, or lack thereof MilitaryOneSource.com. Please email your experience to comments@ejfi.org. If you've found this program was the greatest thing since sliced bread, we'll be happy to say so and recommend it. We would be very pleased to find a government welfare program that works and treats men and women equally.


 

Transitional compensation: Help for victims of domestic abuse

MilitaryOneSource.com

Overview

Top

A military program to help family members who are victims of domestic abuse.

Victims of abuse often feel isolated and discouraged. For the families of service members, this isolation is more intense because they may live far from extended family and friends. Fortunately, the military has programs and resources to help victims of domestic abuse. One of those programs, Transitional Compensation, helps alleviate the financial hardship family members have to face when they decide to leave an abusive relationship.

Eligibility

Top

Transitional Compensation is available to the spouses and children of service members who have been separated from military service or sentenced to a forfeiture of all pay and allowances due to domestic abuse. Family members become eligible for Transitional Compensation under the following circumstances:

• The family member must have been living in the home or married to the service member when the incident or incidents occurred.

• The service member must have served at least 30 days on active duty.

• The service member must be convicted of a dependent-abuse offense and:

(a) separated from military service under a court martial sentence,

(b) sentenced to a forfeiture of all pay and allowances by a court martial for a dependent-abuse offense, or

(c) administratively separated from military service, at least in part, for a dependent-abuse offense.

A dependent-abuse offense must be listed as a reason for the separation or forfeiture, although it does not have to be the primary reason. However, it is very difficult to add dependent abuse as a reason for separation after the service member has left the military.

Compensation

Top

In addition to financial compensation, transitional compensation includes other benefits.

• Amount of compensation. The compensation amount is based on the Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC), which changes annually. Current DIC amounts can be found at the Department of Veterans Affairs Web site at www.vba.va.gov (follow the links under "Benefits" and "Compensation & Pension").

• Length of time compensation is available. Compensation is available for a minimum of 12 months or the unserved portion of the service member's obligated active service, whichever is longer. However, compensation will not extend beyond 36 months.

• Other benefits. As part of the Transitional Compensation program, you may be eligible for other benefits, including medical care, exchange privileges, and commissary privileges

• Applying for Transitional Compensation. Your installation's Family Advocacy Office or Legal Assistance Office can help you apply for Transitional Compensation. Compensation will begin once the application has been approved.

• Ineligibility. You will become ineligible for benefits if you remarry or move back in with the former service member while receiving benefits. If compensation is available for more than 12 months, you will be required to recertify your eligibility for Transitional Compensation annually.

Additional assistance

Top

Transitional Compensation is just one of the resources available to you as a victim of domestic violence. Your installation's Family Advocacy Program has victim advocates who can:

• help you develop a safety plan for you and your family

• help you access a safe house or shelter

• provide counseling

• accompany you to a medical exam or court appearance

• refer you to additional military and civilian resources

• help you apply for Transitional Compensation

It's important to remember that, as a victim of domestic violence, you are not alone. There are resources available to provide information and to help you make the best decisions for you and your family.

Other resources

Top

Marine Corps

Information on Transitional Compensation as well as a directory of victim advocates organized by Marine Corps installation.

Army

Information on Transitional Compensation and victim advocates. Follow the links for Family Advocacy under "Home and Family Life."

Air Force

Enter "Transitional Compensation" in the search box for information about eligibility and applications. Be sure to contact your nearest Family Advocacy Office for more information and help.

Military HOMEFRONT

A Department of Defense Web site for quality-of-life information designed to help troops and their families. Provides contact information for military installations and communities worldwide, resources for military families on a variety of topics, and detailed information about the Family Advocacy Program (FAP), including risk factors for abuse, reporting requirements and options, prevention strategies, and links to the FAP Web page for each service branch. (Click on "Troops and Families," then on "Interpersonal Abuse.")

Family Advocacy Program (FAP) locator

For the FAP locator, click on "Military Installations: Locate Programs and Services." In the first search box, scroll to and click on "Family Advocacy Program" and complete the other requested information.

Family Advocacy Program (FAP) web sites by service branch

Top

Each branch of military service has a Family Advocacy Web page with information about its own FAP policies, procedures, and support services, as well as links to installation programs and related sites. Depending on your service branch, go to:

Army

Click on "Home and Family Life" then on "Family Advocacy."

Marine Corps

Click on "Family Life" then on "Family Advocacy Prg."

Navy

Click on "Support and Services," then on "Community Support Program Policies," then on "Fleet and Family Support Programs."

Air Force

Your installation's support services

Top

You can find more information on Transitional Compensation through your installation's Family Advocacy Program or the Legal Assistance Office. To find the nearest Legal Assistance Office, visit the U.S. Armed Forces Legal Assistance web site at legalassistance.law.af.mil. You can locate your nearest installation by using the Military HOMEFRONT Installation Locator at www.militaryinstallations.dod.mil/ismart/MHF-MI.

Military One Source

Top

This free 24-hour service, provided by the Department of Defense, is available to all active duty, Guard, and Reserve members and their families. Consultants provide information and make referrals on a wide range of issues. You can reach the program by telephone at 1-800-342-9647or through the web site at www.militaryonesource.com.

Top


 

| EJF Home | Find Help | Help the EJF | Comments? | Get EJF newsletter | Newsletters |

| Domestic Violence Book | DV Site Map | Data tables | DV bibliography | DV index |

 

| Chapter 3 — The Impact Of Domestic Violence Laws On Veterans And National Security |

| Next — Another Victim Of The Homeland Security State by William Grigg |

| Back — Feminist Challenge To Secretary Of Defense Rumsfeld by Phyllis Schlafly |


 

Added november 27,2009

Last modified 3/26/14